1921 Mashed Kohlrabi

Ready to eat

Ready to eat

This recipe was adapted from The New Dr. Price Cookbook, by Anonymous (1921).

A new twist on mashed potatoes — what to do with that crazy kohlrabi? Well, if it’s the 1920s, you boil it, mash it, and salt it. According to this recipe from the New Dr. Price Cookbook, “As turnips and potatoes are often boiled and then mashed, so kohlrabi makes a very appetizing dish when prepared in this way.”

Though we’re currently not in kohlrabi season here in Denver, I was able to pick one up at my local awesome organic store. And in the process, I learned that kohlrabi comes in both green and purple varieties. It doesn’t matter which one you choose, just choose one large enough to make a big old pile of mashed kohlrabi to go with your meal. The one I bought happened to be purple and had no greens. If you get one with greens, chop those babies off and use them to make my husband’s Beans & Greens recipe.

Your prep time may be significantly shorter than mine because 1) I don’t have a masher and 2) I don’t have a shredder. Normally, I’d dice the kohlrabi, then boil it and mash it. But sans masher, I chose the shred and boil route. Minus a shredder, I had to chop the kohlrabi ever-so-finely. Oy. Ain’t nothin never easy. But hey, I’m sure this was still one heck of a lot easier than trying to accomplish this on the frontier in the 1920s. So — on to the recipe!

1800s Recipes Series

See all recipes in the series

In celebration of the release of my novel, Moonshine Bloodline, I decided to do a short series of recipes from the 1820 – 1920s, the period in which the story takes place. For the month of April, I’ll release 1 new recipe per week.

I’d really love to boost the number of book reviews on Amazon, so if any of you would like to write a review, I’ll be glad to send you a free copy. Just drop me a line here.

Stats

  • Prep Time: 30 min (though your may be less)
  • Cook Time: 30-40 min
  • Serves: depends on how big the kohlrabi is

What You Need

  • a big ol’ kohlrabi
  • coconut or almond milk as needed
  • a little olive oil or butter
  • salt & pepper to taste

What You Do

  1. Cut the top and bottom off of the kohlrabi.
  2. Peel it with a peeler.
  3. Dice it.
  4. Bring a pot of water to a boil.
  5. Toss the kolhrabi into the boiling water and let it boil for 30 minutes or until the kohlrabi is soft enough to mash well.
  6. Drain off the water and mash with a wooden or a wire potato masher. Or use a blender to make is super smooth.
  7. Season with salt and pepper, and add 1 tablespoonful of butter for each pint of cooked vegetable.
  8. If you need to add a little liquid, add in some milk.
  9. Serve hot.
Choose your kohlrabi

Choose your kohlrabi

Cut off the ends and peel

Cut off the ends and peel

Cube the kohlrabi -- I had to dice super small because I don't have a masher.

Cube the kohlrabi — I had to dice super small because I don’t have a masher.

Toss it in a pot with some salt and a little butter or olive oil. Boil for 30 minutes.

Toss it in a pot with some salt and a little butter or olive oil. Boil for 30 minutes.

Mash the kohlrabi. I had to use the bottom of a drinking glass. Sometimes you've got to get creative...

Mash the kohlrabi. I had to use the bottom of a drinking glass. Sometimes you’ve got to get creative…

Ready to eat. Yours should be more smooth, but it's still good chunky!

Ready to eat. Yours should be more smooth, but it’s still good chunky!

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